Sadness in

Kids

WHEN OUR CHILDREN PERCEIVE US AS STEADY AND CALM—REGARDLESS OF THEIR MOODS OR BEHAVIOR—THEY CAN RELAX, KNOWING THEY CAN RELY ON US TO GET THEM THROUGH THE CHALLENGING MOMENTS OF THEIR LIVES.
― Susan Stiffelman

Things you can say to your Kid

"What's the size of your problem right now?"

"Is this a big problem or a small problem?"

"Will this problem be there tomorrow if it isn't solved right now?"

“Tell me what’s going on in your brain.”

Strategies to try at home

A picture of your family, a pet, or happy memory in a special frame can put their mind at ease

Visualize what their sadness looks like inside their mind and illustrate it on paper so you can connect and see what’s going on in their brain.

Create a space for your child to sit and rest with tools and strategies to 

support them

Breathing:

5 finger breathing, Wave Breathing, Tighten your muscles and then release

 Disclaimer: The resources and ideas found on this website are all research-based and vetted with a parent and educator lens. The tools listed have worked for our children; however, each child is different. This list is not exhaustive and is a compilation of ideas and strategies to try at home.  No information on this website should be used as medical advice. We are not clinical psychologists, but we do work alongside them as thought partners in this journey.